Fabulous Victorian Middle Class Houses

May 7th

Victorian middle class houses – Victorian homes have steep, gabled roofs, intricate woodwork, asymmetrical facades. And interiors with natural and romantic touches. Whether you are remodeling an old Victorian home or just add Victorian features. Attention to period details like paint colors, fabric choices and furniture styles. The old can be new again with a little tender loving care. But do not be afraid to mix new pieces of the old.

White Victorian Middle Class Houses
White Victorian Middle Class Houses

Victorian middle class houses designed for Queen Victoria, which lasted from 1837 to 1901. Although the style is often call the Victorian, it is the time period that is actually Victorian. And it includes many different architectural styles such as Queen Anne, Gothic Revival and Second Empire. The Victorian era began during the Industrial Revolution. Because many home products were available in machine manufacturing instead of handcrafting.

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Home became less stiff and hard, giving way to more colorful, elaborate and creative spaces. victorian middle class houses are often steep roofs with gables in the front, texture shingles, an asymmetrical facade and a story porches. They were mostly made of wood with intricate machine made tuning. Select historically accurate paint colors such as green, dark red, gray and gold. While whites were common in the early 1900s because it was cheap. Victorians much preferred the vivid colors of nature.